Bizarre exchange as Medvedev crashes out

World No.2 Daniil Medvedev has crashed out of Roland-Garros in the quarter-finals, but not before the “wildest match point of the year”.

Serving at 5-6 in the third set against Stefanos Tsitsipas, Medvedev came up with an underarm serve when down match point, only for Tsitsipas to complete the pass and advance to the semi-finals for the second straight year in Paris.

It followed a bizarre passage of play where Medvedev attempted to get himself back into the match, instigating an argument with chair umpire deep in the third set.

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After serving a fault on the first point of the 10th game, Medvedev took exception to the television camera behind Tsitsipas in the otherwise empty stadium.

“It was not like this [before],” Medvedev said.

“If I would have seen it [move], I would give a first serve but there’s nothing I can do now unfortunately,” replied chair umpire Nico Helwerth.

“I’m trying to get you right and you are wrong,” Medvedev insisted.

Grudge match ends with underarm serve gone wrong

“You admit I’m right, it’s a big mistake, 5-4 in the third set. If I lose the match, it’s your fault.”

The last comment appeared to be very much tongue-in-cheek, given the Russian was two sets down at the time, and drew a smirk from both Medvedev and Helwerth.

But the antics didn’t stop there, with Medvedev coming up with an underarm serve while facing match point.

“Didn’t work out at all,” Medvedev said.

Tsitsipas had a different take on the matter.

“A very millennial shot,” he said.

Tsitsipas now faces Alexander Zverev in the semi-finals, as he looks to make his first grand slam final.

For Medvedev, a quarter-final appearance is a win for a player who had never previously won a match at Roland Garros in four appearances.

Coming into the tournament the talk centred on his inability to win on clay, and although he admits he struggled compared to Tsitsipas, there’s plenty of positives to take from the tournament.

“To be honest, the biggest difference was the surface,” Medvedev said, “but when I say this, I finally do not say it in a way, ‘Oh, I cannot play on clay! Mamma mia!’ or whatever.

“It’s just that his shots were better on clay.”

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